I don’t intend for this post to be a, “bash self-publishing party,” or to put down the many, fantastic indie authors that I know. Instead, I simply want to respond to a damned annoying statement that gets brought up in almost every conversation I have with self-published authors. Usually it goes something like, “You shouldn’t waste your time trying to get an agent, because indie publishing is so much better,” and it makes me want to kick someone in the teeth. (Not that I could, a punching bag has literally given me a black eye before.)

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I completely understand that many indie authors hear the exact opposite of what I am experiencing, and I think it would be interesting to read how an indie author deals with the, “Traditional publishing is the only real publishing,” mindset. For this post, I am only going to focus on my experiences, though I really would like to hear if you’ve had to deal with the opposite.

First, the main reason why I have no desire to ever self-publish is because part of my dream is being traditionally published and part of that process is getting an agent. I know it sounds stupid, and it’s not fair, but I place higher prestige on traditionally published books versus self-published ones. I know that there are bad books on both sides, but since I am a nobody, the only way any of my manuscripts will get accepted is if they are actually good. And one of the best people to spot a quality manuscript is an agent.

Off subject, but while there are countless, courteous self-published authors, I always see some SOB in on social media who truly thinks that their work is the best thing ever written. Even through the Internet, their ego has a god damn gravitational pull. I hate the culture of shameless self-promotion. I hate that writers would rather give four and five-star reviews to crap books, simply because they don’t want to hurt another writer’s feelings. I don’t want a participation trophy, and I don’t want to be associated with those kinds of people. I want to earn it.

I understand that many self-pub authors have to market themselves if they hope to have any possible financial success, so it isn’t fair to hate on self-promotion. It takes a lot of work outside of writing to make a book successful, but this is another reason why I don’t want to self-publish. Agents, editors, and publishers exist to fulfill this part of the industry. I love writing and not just narratives. I enjoy writing for my blog, connecting with like-minded people, and pretty much writing whatever I want. I do not like the idea of being forced to make post after post about my own work with the hope that I get a few e-book sales. It makes my success as an author contingent on my ability to market and not my ability to be a fucking writer.

The biggest upside that self-pub authors use to try to convince me is that the royalties are much higher in indie publishing. This is completely true. Amazon offers like 70% royalties while most big houses offer around 10%. The problem with their argument is that most major publishers will offer an advance which will compensate the author for the work that they have all ready put in. An indie book does not see a dime until their book starts selling, and if an indie book flops it doesn’t matter that the author had 70% royalties. Their poorly performing counterpart will still have earned their author a few thousand dollars in an advance.

There is one last item that makes me never want to self-publish. 9 out of 10 self-published books that I have read are terrible, but 10 out of 10 self-published authors believe that their book is the exception. If I self-published, I could never be sure that my stuff wasn’t crap just like the rest of them. I should add that I am okay with writing crap, hell that’s pretty much all I write right now, but I’m not okay with that being the culmination of my life’s work.

If I ever publish a novel it will be with a traditional publisher. Like I said at the beginning, this has not been a knock against indie publishing, but rather a response to all of the people who try to belittle my choice of pursuing my dream. I still would love to hear about indie authors dealing with snobby people from traditional publishing, so if you have a story please don’t hold back. I hope that everyone is having a wonderful day and that at least someone found this helpful.

 

65 thoughts on “Why I’ll Never Self-Publish

  1. Even though I want to self-publish, I pretty much agree with everthing you’ve written. I want to be traditionally published (by a big publisher – not a small one) because of the prestige, the only problem is it is actually quite hard to get picked up by a big publisher when you are a relative nobody. And there’s no way in hell I’ll ever submit to a small publisher – even if they are traditional. I think self-publishing can be really good for those authors who are actually really good writers, but who are constantly overlooked due to the whole ‘slush pile’ factor. But, as you said, how are you supposed to know if you’re even a good writer? I was picked up by a small publisher earlier this year, but they went bust and closed. Because they were so small and inexperienced, I still have no idea if I’m even a good writer. Oh well! Once I get my book edited I’m going to start submitting to the big & mid range tradtional publishers. No small traditionals for me! (Except pantera press in Australia… they look amazing)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so sorry to hear about your publisher, but that is still awesome that your manuscript had been accepted. I have found literary conventions as an awesome way to kind of by pass the slush pile. You are able to meet agents and editors, and if they are interested in your story they will give you their business card with their personal email, so you don’t have to submit into the slush account. I am currently working on a rewrite so I can send one of my manuscripts to an agent who’d requested it this way. Congratulations again on getting you acceptance despite the outcome with the publisher. That is a lot more than what some people achieve.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It’s funny you mentioned conventions, I’m about to post a blog tonight about the pitching workshop/event I’m attending over three weekends that ends with a 10 minute private face to face with a big name publisher! It’s definitely a good way to rise above the slush pile, as you said. On author called Sophie Masson told us at the workshop this past Saturday that meeting a publisher face to face gives you a higher chance of being ‘found’ then just submitting queries by email. Congrats on the request from the agent and good luck!!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Although I am one of the dreaded self published, I do appreciate your thoughts on the subject. I have tried the traditional route, had an agent and everything. Almost got picked up several times, only to be disapointed. So now I do it myself, and you are right, it’s not the same. The only consolation is actually seeing your book in print.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. It is a totally different scenario. Of course we would all love our books to be taken on, cared for and cossetted, but these days there are far too many books out there, all wanting the same thing. Self publishing could be regarded as a waste of time and even further away from your dreams, but there is always hope, isn’t there?

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Steven, I can completely understand how you feel – I was the same a few years ago – it was traditional or nothing. But after a while of ‘nothing’ I decided to give the self-pub idea a go. Now I have 7 novels on Amazon and make a small but decent income. The dream of becoming traditionally published is still there but I’m not sitting around waiting for it. I use promotional companies to promote my novels, hire an editor and cover designer and keep my energies for my writing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I completely understand that sentiment, and congratulations on having seven novels out there. Since you still have the dream of becoming trad. published, do you set project aside that you intend to submit or how do you go about juggling the two?

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  4. I’m sorry anyone belittles your choice in traditional publishing. It’s a worthy choice! Of course, now I’m biting my lip, thinking, “boy, I hope my MS didn’t set off the irked feelings, especially with the whole 9 out of 10 business. . . .” I’ve waffled back and forth over trad vs indie so often it’s ridiculous. Ultimately, I chose indie, as you already know. Still, I’d love the traditional confirmation of my talent. But the one thing which you mentioned that I have a hard time with, and have seen first hand with my trad published friends, is that unless your book is guaranteed to sell like hotcakes the publishing houses will offer next to no marketing for your book. Most of that will be up to your personal legwork anyway. Then to top it off they’ll have in place a hundred restrictions on how you can go about doing that marketing yourself. I feel like any way a person turns there’s a catch22. An advance would be nice! And so would recognition by an industry pro! 🙂 I say follow your dream, Steven! It’s a right good one.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. In regards to your manuscript, I actually told my girlfriend when I started reading it, that it is really nice seeing a self-pub book that doesn’t feel like a self-pub book. I could tell a diffrence in the quality in your writing after the first page. I have been slacking and I have gotten very far into it yet, so I can’t comment much on the overall story yet.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Haha well I appreciate hearing that, Steven. I definitely take this whole process seriously. I’m an advocate for putting your best work out there so that we can all be good representatives of the indie world. I totally understand about the slacking, haha, as I’m there myself with a couple beta reads. I just appreciate you taking the time to do it at all!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. We all have our own reasons for going either trad or indie but…if not wanting to market yourself is one reason for going trad, I fear you will be disappointed. Even traditionally published debut authors are expected to do their own marketing. It’s just the way things are now. That said, spamming ‘buy my book’ is not what marketing is all about. Your blog is establishing your brand, and that is a great first step. Good luck in whatever you end up doing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think what I meant in regards to marketing equally success for self-published books is that I feel that self-pubbed books get confirmation of their quality by selling large numbers. (I know there are exceptions to this.) With trad publishing I feel that a large portion of personal success comes from just getting accepted and that monetary success is just the icing on the cake.

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  6. I recognize a few of my old fallacies in your post. Here’s one:

    “the only way any of my manuscripts will get accepted is if they are actually good. And one of the best people to spot a quality manuscript is an agent.”

    If only this were true. What an agent, and a large publishing house by extension, is looking for is a *marketable* manuscript. The reason Harry Potter was rejected so many times wasn’t because the story wasn’t any good; it’s because no one thought they could sell it. It was a stroke of luck that someone finally took a chance on something new and different.

    With self-publishing, the audience determines what is quality and what is marketable. And is that who really matters–the reader?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Completely solid point. I think that readers determine the overall financial success of a book, but I do not put the same weight in the average readers like for a book as I would put into an editor who’s livelihood is built off of working with literature. I am not talking about financial success, I am talking about the all most euphoric feeling that I have gotten when I have received an acceptance letter for a short story. I imagine a novel sale would be even better.

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  7. Another:

    “I understand that many self-pub authors have to market themselves if they hope to have any possible financial success… It makes my success as an author contingent on my ability to market and not my ability to be a fucking writer.”

    Again, alas, this is not the case. Or at least it no longer is. The idea of the author tucked away from society, sipping whiskey and crafting genius while the agents and publishers work tirelessly to sell that genius…is a fairytale.

    Marketing budgets are shrinking; even in big publishing houses. Bigger “name brand” authors get the lion’s share of the budget and new authors sink or swim in their first few months. And if your book isn’t magically a runaway hit despite little to no advertising? It’s off the shelves the next year.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think that you are still equating monetary success with personal success. In either situation, making tons of money is deemed a good thing. Statistically speaking it is likely I would have a, “meh,” selling book in either one. If I was traditionally published, I would have the personal satisfaction of at least making it that far with self-publishing I wouldn’t.

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  8. PS — Not all self-publishers are people who couldn’t hack it or couldn’t get an agent. Some of us didn’t even query for our books. It’s the new Wild West out there and if you’re willing to take a chance, you could potentially strike it big. I think that’s the main draw of traditional publishing: it feels safe. It feels like you’ll have a team working for you, and unfortunately, for the vast majority of authors that simply isn’t true. I’ve spoken with many traditionally published authors and there’s no hand holding in that career path either.

    PPS — If you’re interested, Hugh Howey has a great blog about “indie” vs “traditional” publishing. Here’s a fun post: http://www.hughhowey.com/a-peek-behind-the-curtain/

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am not discounting your opinion, but I feel the exact opposite. I think self-publishing is the safe option, because someone doesn’t have to worry about getting rejected. They know that their work will see print. I don’t think that all self-publishers are people who couldn’t make it, and I know that there are countless self-publishers with far better writing skills than me. I also think that every self-published writer knows that on average self-publishing has a lower quality of work. I don’t mean to attack anyone else’s choices, and I do think it takes a lot of skill to create fantastic self-published books. At this point in time, I don’t have an interest going in that direction.

      Btw thank you so much for the link. I will definitely check it out, and I would love to look into some of your work. Would you have any suggestions?

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      1. Thanks for the civility in your replies. I’ll address all three threads here, since I’ve noticed a common theme. I think what it boils down to, is that you’re talking about validation, not success. No one heralds a great work of literature or the best genre fiction by saying, “The author’s agent loved it!” It might mean something to you, but that’s about it.

        There is absolutely rejection in self-publishing. The difference is that it happens inside the market. Zero sales? That’s rejection. There’s also validation: I receive occasional emails or tweets from readers who love my stuff. Obviously, it feels great!

        As for the average of self-publishing being lower quality, I’d disagree. There are plenty of shit-published works out there where the author is either delusional or after a cash-grab, but there are also real gems. But you could say the same thing about traditional publishers. How about “A Shore Thing” by Snooki? I’d say there’s a strong argument that the publisher was either delusional or after a cash-grab too.

        I don’t think you’re attacking anyone’s choices, and I’m not trying to convince you to self-publish, I just think most of your reasons are off-base. The reason I chose to reply is because I used to believe the myths too. Oh, and cash advance? Not everyone gets one, and it comes out of future royalties. You “pay it back” before you earn more.

        PS – Very kind to offer to check out my work, though I hope you’ll realize I was not here for the dreaded self-promotion. If you are sincere, you can check out my “Click Your Poison” series of interactive novels. You make choices as the reader, and those change the outcome of each book. Here’s a link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B011M9RXNY/

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you for not being a troll as well. I’m pretty sure the Internet has way too many of those anyway. I actually think that you are right. I think at my current point, I am more concerned with validation than success. It would be awesome to be a best-seller, but at my current point I actually want to be validated for all the time I have spent working on my writing. I will definitely check it out, and I do not think of this as self-promotion because I had requested it. I hope you are having a wonderful day, and I am looking forward to talking with you in the future.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. I haven’t decided if I’ll self publish or not. To me, self publishing is a lot of work if I want to make it the best. Editing and good cover art are not cheap. I do think the media makes it sound too good to be true at times. I think you should stick to your goals!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. There are many successful indie authors, which is great. I think media makes it sound too good to be true, because a lot of work goes into self publishing and it’s not a “get rich” quick scheme. You can have the greatest, self published work, but you still have to promote and market it well. That can be a lot of work for one person. I think self publishing is awesome though, but it doesn’t mean success overnight.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. To each their own. I will admit, when I first started I dreamed of coffee with agents, standees with my book on it in the front of Barnes & Noble, a nice fat advance check, and a lovely mountain or penguin on the spine of my cover. And perhaps I could still have all those things if I’d only been more patient, attended more networking events, or moved to NYC or London to rub elbows with the gatekeepers. Who knows. What I do know though is I have a book with my name on it on a shelf. Today. Not at some future time, but now.

    And because I didn’t go traditional, I can keep writing and publishing, gaining skill and growing more confident each time because I’ve learned more about myself through this process than I might have had I taken another path.

    And yes, I’ve been dismissed entirely because I didn’t go traditional and I’ve learned to be okay with that. I made the decision that was right for me, just as you are making the decision that is right for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do think that being able to say, “I am an author,” is a really big pro to self publishing, because as of right now I can’t point to a book that is mine, and I might not ever be able to do it. I think that you are right in that self-publishing gives people tons of experience writing, editing, and ultimately running a business. I do not think that it is right to dismiss a self-published book simply because it is self-published.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Both traditional and indie have positives and negatives. The direction an author chooses really is a personal one. I kind of think that someone saying that a method is hands down better than the other for everyone is indicative to the person not being very well informed.

    That being said, I think that this statement isn’t the most well-informed either:

    “I do not like the idea of being forced to make post after post about my own work with the hope that I get a few e-book sales. It makes my success as an author contingent on my ability to market and not my ability to be a fucking writer.”

    If an indie author’s primary marketing strategy is blasting social media with self serving posts, my guess is that that author isn’t going to sell many books. Lots of people sell a lot of books without ever using any kind of social media.

    I also have to say that, if you think that you’re not going to have to market as a traditionally published author … well, that’s just not my understanding of how things work.

    Again, how you publish is your business. There are many valid reasons to go traditional, and many valid reasons to go indie. Based on this post, however, I’m not 100% sure that you’re basing your decision on facts.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I get that, and honestly I would say a large portion of my decision is based on personal feelings. I know it doesn’t make sense, but it is true. In regards to the marketing, I would tend to agree that I don’t think people who blast social media with, “Buy me ads,” are very successful in their efforts. What I mean is that placing success on how money will likely make me disappointed in either field. By placing a large portion of that success on acceptance, will still give me something to fall back on, when my book mostly likely becomes just another book that no one really cares about.

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  12. At the London Book Fair last year there were rows and rows of books being sold off cheaply that had been originally taken on by the big publishers, but had not sold. Authors who have books published traditionally still have to market their work along with self-published authors. The way I see it is that usually agents are eager to sell books by celebrities that are in the public eye. I no longer think it’s worth stressing over sending work to agents. Instead I have three of my books with an independent publisher, Creativia, who do very well regarding book marketing. I aim to have more of my books with them by the end of next year. Some of Creativia’s authors are best-sellers.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Congratulations by the way! I think there is always going to be some sort of marketing involved if a writer wants to achieve financial success. Upon discussing this topic with a few people today, I think my real problem is how some self-pub authors go about it. Some try to push their work down your throat, while I have never experienced the same with a trad. author.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Having done both and experienced both sides of the coin…

    One doesn’t need an agent to get traditionally published. I got picked up by an acquisition editor. They picked up my first book (recently published), picked up book 2 (due out in Spring 2017), and optioned book 3. And still don’t have an agent. Though, now, if I want or feel I need one, it’ll be much easier.

    Traditionally published authors must now carry the bulk of the weight for marketing. And the constant “buy me” doesn’t work in that arena either. The biggest difference, and the reason I chased getting traditionally published, is that a publisher can reach people that the indie author cannot. It’s much easier to get your books shelved in Barnes & Noble, much easier to get placed with Indie bookstores. Between that and an advance it rather makes up for the lower royalty.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That is really helpful. Liz Gorinsky from Tor told me pretty much the same thing at this year’s WorldCon. The reason why I want an agent is partly for them to help sell my work, partly so that they can negotiate on my behalf, and also so that they can get it into international markets that I could not.

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  14. I am traditionally published. I managed to get a fantastic agent. I ended up signing a two-book deal with a digital-only imprint of one of the Big Five. I would have preferred to get a print deal as well, and I did have to sign over my print rights. I could have walked away, but many of the other Big Five imprints had said, “We love it, but don’t know how to market,” which is code for, “Not enough straight, white, male characters.”

    But that said, I did sign a deal with no advance, but a 50% cut of net profits. And my publisher did a great job with editing, cover design, and has been marketing the hell out of it, including a successful Bookbub run.

    If the series isn’t pickup up for additional books, I plan to self-pub the rest of the series. In that case, I will hire professionals to edit, format, and design the cover.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I’m sitting on the fence myself. Thing is, prestige doesn’t necessarily convert to book sales if they give you a crappy cover. Sadly, authors have no say on the cover art.
    I have a friend who got published from a big 5 house and even though the book was brilliant and one of the best of the subgenre, it flopped cause the cover was absolute garbage, not only dull as hell but not even remotely matching the book’s main genre, let alone the theme. It got half-decent sales only book bloggers picked it up and it got a few fans promoting it around. Thing is, the cover was so crappy even I put off reading it for months, and would still not read it by now if my friends who are fans of the same genre didn’t highly recommend it. The only marketing this book is getting is word of mouth, since no one will pick it form the store shelves with that horrid cover. There are other horror stories I know of. It’s really a gamble, and whether you are trad pubbed or indie, you still have to put a lot of work to marketing and establish a solid social media/blog network to get the word out there.

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  16. I get what you mean. People might bash their ideas onto. Especially conventional ideas. However you do you. Regardless if an author self publishes or goes by an agent, a true author will succeed anyway…

    – Beep Toot

    Liked by 1 person

      1. No worries. I believe that there are only certain things we can control. The marketing of the work may be extraordinary but it doesn’t necessarily guarantee success for an author. I believe the quality of the work is what is important, because regardless of the marketing, within time it will be recognised and acknowledged around the world like wild fire.

        – Beep Toot

        Liked by 1 person

  17. We’ve heard from several traditionally published authors that the marketing of your book is really up to you even via that means. I’ve also been told by a publisher that agents and publishing houses are looking for people who already did much of the marketing work for them by building their own publicity and following.

    Just take a look at the music industry and even movies. Good doesn’t get put on big screens and stages as much as marketable these days. That’s just the world we live in.. it sucks, but that’s the hole art has fallen into.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are so right! Honestly, there are plenty of really talented people that just don’t have the visibility that would allow an industry to take a risk on them. In some ways, it becomes a business decision rather than a decision based alley off merit.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Exactly. The self-published authors we work with are over traditional publishing, but if you’d like us to help you build your brand as you search for an agent, let us know.

        That’s how the Alexis Chateau brand grew. Our founder is a novelist herself and wanted to build a brand before pitching agents. Now we’re an agency.

        Whatever your decision, we wish you all the best 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  18. agents, publishers and all these affiliates — you think will market your book? you do not know the current state of publishing. or kidding yourself. they won’t do a thing. unless your name is Brittney Spears, Paterson, sell vampire books or a Karshitdean. Worked in publishing 25 years. you must do your own promo now. the best editors and ghostwriters (frankly I’m in that realm–more than 400 best sellers/award winners) we do not need the houses anymore. the houses get the left overs who will sit in an office all day. at 1/4th the pay. And interns.

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    1. Feel free to go your own route, I’m not stopping you. While it is true that a publisher will not go all out to market an author unless they are a huge name, they will obtain co-op space at bookstores, organize book reviews, as well as promote their new releases within their newsletters. This is still marketing.

      Self-publishers have to do all of this on their own. Some of these options are not even possible (co-op space in Barnes & Noble for one). In addition, there are several magazines that refuse to review self-published work. If you are not aware of this, you are kidding yourself.

      Honestly, I don’t really believe your claim of “400 bestsellers/award winners.” You have no website associated with “Equestrian Editor” and your Facebook page has 629 likes.

      You do realize that celebrities are not the only people who publish books, right? Feel free to use a straw man fallacy if you want, but you are not convincing anyone. Did Sabaa Tahir’s book “An Ember in the Ashes,” get published because she was famous? What about Patrick Rothfuss’s “Name of the Wind”? James Islington’s “The Shadow of What Was Lost?” These were all debut novels that have done awesome and are incredibly well written.

      Have fun with your 400 bestsellers. It’s obvious that you have an awesome command of the English language. Maybe, that’s why you couldn’t get published.

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  19. Your blog here, as well as most of the comments here is incredibly helpful. Having so many thoughtful, well informed people out there about this topic is such a gold mind of information. Thank you for this. I have been debating back and forth now for a while on what to do. I have my first book toward the tail end of editing, I have the cover being created by a lovely artist. I have a date in mind of when I’d publish if I DO decide to go self publishing, but I am still very much on the fence. I am just not sure at all….I have 4 books in my series, and with the first one almost done, the second one a rough draft and book 3 and 4 outlined….perhaps I should hold off and wait for the agent to come alone, or a publisher. The idea of traditional is very intriguing….and since I’ve been at this series for 5 years and change, what’s the problem in waiting a bit longer? After reading through all these notes and comments….I am still very much on the fence.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reading, and I can’t express how awesome it is that you found this post helpful. Congrats on nearing the end of your first book, and if you want to self-publish, I definitely think you should do it. I don’t want to be the guy that acts like my ideas should apply to everyone.

      Ultimately, what do you want out of writing? I think personal desires are really important to the traditional vs. self-publishing decision.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I would say the main thing I want is to get my story out there,and the second thing I want is to feel a strong sense of accomplishment. I have always had a strong desire to go traditional. I think with the ease of self publishing (and I say that with a heaviness because self publishing isn’t really “easy” just more accessible) I found that traditional was losing its calling. However…I’ll be honest and say I haven’t really tried yet. Once I finish my book, I think my plan is to work for a solid year to get published…or an agent….and if by then (hopefully with book two on its way mind you 😉 I’m not walking down success path…..then I will self publish. Because at the end of the day I don’t care about the money. I just want to put the word out there. If someone happens to read it, and even better if that person enjoys it, then it’s a win. Then and only then, will I feel happy to call it a success on all accounts.

        And thank you for the congrats. I think writers are really the only ones to understand the pain of writing, the obsession and the power. It’s wonderful And horrible, you know?

        Liked by 1 person

      1. I love writing fiction. I want to do well enough with writing someday (hopefully in the next 5-10 years) that I can work part-time and support myself in part by writing. Otherwise, I’ll be so busy with work I won’t have enough time to dedicate to my passion. So my goal with writing is to afford to keep writing.

        Liked by 1 person

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